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Ceridwen

Ceridwen

You kids get off my lawn. 

Every minute of her life

Dearly, Departed - Lia Habel

Cross-posted on Soapboxing

 

"She would of been a good woman," The Misfit said, "if it had been somebody there to shoot her every minute of her life." 

 

Now, I admit my upbringing was in some ways unorthodox (and in other ways completely not), but this was a favorite aphorism of my mother's. It comes from the climax of "A Good Man is Hard to Find" by St Flannery O'Connor. The Misfit has just murdered an entire family while they were on a road trip, ending in the death of the grandma. She's a horrible old bitty who doesn't deserve to be gunned down on the side of the road, but maybe it's also not the biggest tragedy ever either. But, you know, violence is cathartic and purifying, at least in St Flannery's brutal theologies, so the horrid grandma has a humanistic epiphany at the barrel of a gun. Baptism by drowning, the last moments as your lungs constrict and your eyelids flash and flutter, reborn as your best self right before you die. 

 

I think of this quote every time I encounter something that has all this incredible potential -- this heat of possibility -- and then it spins out into something more dreary and obvious. Dearly, Departed by Lia Habel has a shitton of potential, for me anyway, being as it is a steampunk zombie novel. Steampunk is maybe more problematic for me, in that I have undertaken its perusal because of my husband's interests more than my own, but I am all over zombies all day. Both zombie and steampunk narratives often deal in social stratification, though obviously to very different ends. Smooshing them together could be fruitful in examining a rigidly class based society, but I know well enough not to expect such a thing, especially after Deck Z

 

Occasionally this novel hits a mild frisson of this cultural examination, but mostly it opts for the spunky heroine and glaring infodumps over, like, insight. I was okay with the spunky heroine -- she is a creature too ubiquitous to truly criticize -- but the infodumps killed me. Apparently (and I use this adverb when I'm being an asshole), peak oil and maybe a nuclear devastation and probably the eruption of the supervolcano under Yellowstone lead to everyone heading south to central America, where some folk recreated the Victorians, and some other folk did not. I just...this was one of many situations where the explanations for the universe killed me, even if the universe did not. I'm going to accept your fictional world if you don't overexplain, because the minute you do, I'm like, hold the phone. No, no, no. The world-building needed to be shot every day of its life. 

 

This aside, Habel did get into some interesting stuff about the ways the lower classes are used against themselves, and as fodder for border warfare as a stand in for class warfare. The set up is that there is a border skirmish between the Vickies and the Punks, and a zombie outbreak has been bubbling in this DMZ, alternately used as biological warfare and "shock and awe". The zombies in this universe go rabid, but after a time they resettle with their former personalities intact. The zombie soldiers were well realized, suffering both from the trauma of warfare, and from the guilt of their actions while rabid. 

 

"Her collars and cuffs were white organdy trimmed with lace and at her neckline she had pinned a purple spray of cloth violets containing a sachet. In case of an accident, anyone seeing her dead on the highway would know at once that she was a lady." 

The problem is sartorial, in the end. Steampunk, maybe at its most basic, must dress a certain way to be steampunk. There will be corsets and umbrellas and bustles, and there must be the cruel social architecture to justify such a costume (cf. the museum exhibit Fashion Victims: The Pleasures and Perils of Dress in the 19th Century.) Habel does a fair amount of pushback against the social stratification -- more than the usual, well, duh, of course a rigidly stratified society is unfair kind you see in steampunk -- but I think trips over the skirts of gender politics. Her heroines are the usual spunky middle class ladies who behave almost entirely like modern girls, but there's all this hand-waving to gender norms that just couldn't produce such a creature. They put on the clothes, but it didn't do more than touch their skin. 

 

I've been burbling along with all my socioeconomic whatnot, and I feel like I should say I totally get that this is a steampunk romance zombie novel written for teens. My bitch isn't that this book isn't more than it is. It is what it is, and moreover, I was pleasantly surprised by some of the turns and twists. All this aside, my real problem is the romance between a living girl and a walking decomposing corpse. (Admittedly, these zombies are more desiccated than rotting; still.) Habel honestly gave it the college try, and their courtship -- taking place, as it does, like Pyramus and Thisbe through a wall -- was honestly sweet. But it's like the ultimate catfish to find out that dude's a corpse who doesn't have the requisite blood flow to, you know.

 

Tons of women lost their damn minds over Edward Cullen's cold, lifeless body, so I think there's probably something to say about the sexualization of undead flesh, especially in teen fiction. (Warm Bodies tried too; ugh.) There could be something here, probably, about love and sexual desire and the death wish in adolescence, etc, but I felt like Habel was too busy selling it as not-gross and self-evidently kinda racist to think this pairing might be squicky. I guess I'm not buying it on those terms, and I can't get past my shudder at the thought of making out with cold, blue lips. Maybe this could have been twisted in such a way to turn my revulsion back on me, but it wasn't. I'd pay good money to see such a thing though,

 

And then shoot it every day of its life.

 

So that you would know I was a lady.