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Ceridwen

Ceridwen

You kids get off my lawn. 

Bew Bew!

The Star Thief - Jamie Grey

Cross-posted on Soapboxing

 

The Star Thief by Jamie Grey is a hugely silly and energetic romp around a space opera playset of no particular note, and, as such, was utterly charming to me. Just about every single trope of the genre is deployed with extreme prejudice - the MacGuffin (actually, several), technobabble tech, mercenaries (with or without hearts of gold), tough but caring sergeants, mad scientists, bad childhoods, indistinguishable same-language speaking planets, aliens, empaths, slums, the Fate of the Universe, etc etc. The plot is pure Scooby Doo, with Bad Guys and Red Herrings playing a game of idiot poker with the reader; I can see the cards you have, friend. But it starts fast and does not ever slow down to whinge about, like, politics or needless exposition or, god help us all, philosophy, which I actually count as a good thing. There's a lot of cut-rate philosophizin' going on in space opera, and reading one that wasn't fussed about that jibber-jabber felt like a breath of fresh air. Just set the reactor to explode and haul ass. 

 

Renna Carrizal is a 23 year old master thief who's pulled off the most famous heist in the 'verse (of course). She's on one last job which will give her the money she needs to retire (of course) when it all goes wrong. She's to pick up some technonanablasterthing, and (of course) is sidetracked in the rescue of a young boy she finds locked in a cage (of course). She has no particular maternal feelings (of course), but this kid is Different Somehow. Of course. From then on it's all bew bew as she's more or less blackmailed by some kind of military slash secret government outfit (?) to go get this one thing and bew bew bew. Also, there's a Captain Tightpants with whom she has a history. Hubba hubba.

 

Frankly, there are a lot of things that don't make a lick of sense about the plot. The somewhat snort-worthy named MYTH is an organization which is somehow both a Star Fleet-ish governmental agency and a secret organization with terrorist-style cells who don't know one another because...? How does that work, exactly? Generally terrorist-style cells are used by terrorists, and all the military boy-scouting and honor of the soldiers just felt weird and wrong. People who are supposedly hardened mercs are a lot more gormless and guileless than I would expect. But whatever. The prose is just gleefully patchwork, tossing in all manner of hat-tips and allusions to other space operas, from the Doctor's sonic screwdriver to BSG's frakking. It's not particularly well synthesized, but then it's also hilarious and awesome. 

 

It is my understanding that The Star Thief is an indie title, and it shows. I didn't notice any copy editing errors, but it did have some rough edges on it that a story editor would have ground off. Lines such as, "The entire word had shifted, like she was fucking Alice in Wonderland..." seriously cracked me up. If you want the f-bomb there to be read as an intensifier and not as a transitive verb, I humbly suggest rewriting the line as, "The entire world had shifted, like she was Alice in fucking Wonderland..." You're welcome. There were some cut-and-pasty seeming conversations and thought processes, although some of this could be attributed to the conventions of the romance plot that's wound through the proceedings. Boy, can romance heroines wheel-spin if you let them, though, admittedly, the spun wheels here weren't lingered on too much. We've got explosions to walk away from, after all. 

 

And while it may seem I'm praising this with faint damns, I'm really not. I've been hacking my way though the Expanse series by James S.A. Corey recently, and while that series is just brilliantly plotted and meticulous about its geo-slash-solar-system politics and world building, on some level it lacks the rough energy of something like The Star Thief. A better edited version of this book would not have the same slapdash charm. Jamie Grey was having just a helluva good time writing The Star Thief, working the kind of nerding that's more interested in gameplay than rolling up the characters. No, this isn't better than Leviathan Wakes, but on some level it's more fun. 

 

Which is not to say that the plot coupons and convenient Chekhovian guns couldn't rankle in the wrong mood. The sheer tumble of the plot means that brutal, terrible things like watching the destruction of your home town are not given the emotional resonance they deserve, but then it's not like this hasn't been a thing in space opera since Vader vaporized Alderaan while Leia watched, and likely before. (I like Carrie Fisher's quip from a 1983 interview with Rolling Stone that "[Leia] has no friends, no family; her planet was blown up in seconds—along with her hairdresser—so all she has is a cause.") I also recognize that it is a dick move as a reviewer to praise a book for its lack of emotional depth, and then cut it for the very same reason. These are the cards I've been dealt. 

 

Renna is nastier than Leia, more Cat Woman than Princess, not troubled too greatly about using her sexuality as a weapon or shanking assholes who deserve it. (You know, not that Renna is a better character or anything.) I could do without Renna's casual girl-hating in the beginning, and the general non-importance of female characters other than Renna. Again, this is a general problem with space opera, which tends to fail the Bechdel test much harder (as a genre) than just about any other I can think of, short of werewolf books. At least the girl-hating seems to dissipate by the end; she has learned a valuable lesson about women in authority. Or something. Bew bew!