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Ceridwen

Ceridwen

You kids get off my lawn. 

The Art of Losing

The Art of Losing: Poems of Grief and Healing - Kevin Young

Cross-posted on Soapboxing.net

 

I'm in the middle of planning the last of my grandparents' funerals, the one for my Grandma Dory who died three weeks ago. I'm a mess, and I'm not going to sugarcoat that. This is going to be messy. 

 

Writing Grandpa Ed's was easy, though the writing was the only easy thing about it. I was about to be married, and my mother, his daughter, was out of the country, and my sister was sicker than I've ever seen her. I ended up blinking, dazed, in this foreign country of grief, digging through the papers on his desk in the basement room of his house, the one he called office. There was a stack of photos on the desk, this chronology of his life. He knew he was dying. I moused open his computer, which was a cast-off from my college days, which I'd set to the largest system font I could find to accommodate his blindness. He was writing to the end. 

 

The easy thing about his funeral was that he was a man for poetry: maudlin, Celtic, one of those large, performing personalities that acts as subterfuge for a moody, feeling introvert. Dylan Thomas, we said, almost at once. Fern Hill. We made my dad read the poem, which was almost a cruelty I can see now. At the time all I knew was that I couldn't read it. I can barely read it now.

 

Nothing I cared, in the lamb white days, that time would take me
Up to the swallow thronged loft by the shadow of my hand,
       In the moon that is always rising,
               Nor that riding to sleep
       I should hear him fly with the high fields
And wake to the farm forever fled from the childless land.
Oh as I was young and easy in the mercy of his means,
               Time held me green and dying
       Though I sang in my chains like the sea.
 
Dad was the only one who fit my grandfather's suits, and there was a fashion party as we stood in my grandfather's narrow room and shrugged them onto his shoulders. The red one, with the big 70s lapels. The dappled grey and black one in a winter wool. The ties on a tie rack. Grandpa's car, which took us to the funeral and then refused to work again, like a dog pining at an empty bedside. 
 
Grandpa Chris was the next. He was not a man for poetry - reed-thin and active, Scandinavian and full of puns. He had a doctor's sensibility, all bedside manner and efficiency and easy charm. In a book called Medical Mentors: Practicing the Art of Medicine in Duluth 1927-1996 by Kathleen Hannan, my grandfather said:
 

"Do what you like to do. Live in the area that you would like to live. Enjoy your time off. I like the more simple life, down to earth. In a smaller town you have so many friends, real genuine friends."

 

Also in the book, he talked about his mother's death, when he was six, of child-bed fever. It was the defining moment of his life, in some ways, this woman lost a century ago. I wish I'd met her. I wish she'd lived long enough to raise him up so he didn't keep looking for her all those years later in the throes of his senior dementia. I wonder about her funeral. It would have been horrible, like all funerals for young women and new mothers. I went and bought my son a suit today and worried about his hair grown long. I can just see Chris at six with an ill-fitting new suit and a haircut. I can see his infant sister. The prairie of Iowa would have been hard and flat.  

 

At his service I read “How One Winter Came in the Lake Region” by Wilfred Campbell, a Canadian Anglican priest. I'm not sure anyone understood why, including me, but then I'm not sure I care. It was right, this slow freezing and the joy in that, the shift of seasons. 

 

"When one strange night the sun like blood went down,
Flooding the heavens in a ruddy hue;
Red grew the lake, the sere fields parched and brown,
Red grew the marshes where the creeks stole down,
But never a wind-breath blew.
 
That night I felt the winter in my veins,
A joyous tremor of the icy glow;
And woke to hear the north's wild vibrant strains,
While far and wide, by withered woods and plains,
Fast fell the driving snow."

 

 

My Grandma Fran, I can't even work out the timeline for her death. She died so long and sudden. I have these memories of driving over the hills and bridges of Allegheny county, past the grim and vibrant steel towns laid down by the rivers of Pennsylvania. I remember my daughter in a fountain playing until the hospital security guard told us to get out. I remember flying home and waiting for the call from my mother, who stayed there until the end, or one of them. I remember cleaning out the house. 

 

 Fran was not a woman for poetry either. When I named my daughter after her, she was so perplexed: why would you do that? It wasn't false modesty either, but something weirder, something hard and unsentimental. I never saw either of my grandmothers cry in the decades I knew them. I read Dylan Thomas's "After the Funeral (In Memory of Ann Jones)" at her funeral. It was a counterpoint to Ed's Fern Hill. I don't know that there is anything written that could sum Fran in either poetry or prose.

 

I know her scrubbed and sour humble hands
Lie with religion in their cramp, her threadbare
Whisper in a damp word, her wits drilled hollow,
Her fist of a face died clenched on a round pain;
And sculptured Ann is seventy years of stone.
These cloud-sopped, marble hands, this monumental
Argument of the hewn voice, gesture and psalm
Storm me forever over her grave until
The stuffed lung of the fox twitch and cry Love
And the strutting fern lay seeds on the black sill.

 

And now Dory. I have to account for you in words now too, and I'm not sure I'm at the task of it. Dad and I trade phone calls, working out logistics; my children, who have been muddy with odd grief, calls from the teacher in the last month; what has happened? The Art of Losing at my knee last night, paging, paged. There's so much here that gets the heart of it, but cannot be spoken aloud in a Cremation Society building in downtown Duluth. It would not be fair. 

 

Translation

by Franz Wright

 

Death is nature's way

of telling you to be quiet.

 

Of saying it's time

to be weaned, your conflagration

starved to diamond.

 

I'll give you something to cry about.

 

And what those treetops swaying

dimly in the wind spelled. 

 

Dory was so domestic, so practiced in the arts of familiar deception. She was the most accomplished liar of my acquaintance, who rolled mythology as simple as truth. She read me maudlin Scandinavian folk tales as a kid, which I cried about with the pleasure of sorrowful fiction. She knitted like she breathed. She was the last, most important member of that generation to leave me here. I'm still surprised that it was possible for her to die.  

 

Only until this cigarette is ended, 
A little moment at the end of all, 
While on the floor the quiet ashes fall, 
And in the firelight to a lance extended, 
Bizarrely with the jazzing music blended, 
The broken shadow dances on the wall, 
I will permit my memory to recall 
The vision of you, by all my dreams attended. 
And then adieu,--farewell!--the dream is done. 
Yours is a face of which I can forget 
The colour and the features, every one, 
The words not ever, and the smiles not yet; 
But in your day this moment is the sun 
Upon a hill, after the sun has set.

 

Edna St Vincent Millay