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Ceridwen

Ceridwen

You kids get off my lawn. 

Born To Darkness - Suzanne Brockmann Another day, another plane read.

Born to Darkness by Suzanne Brockmann was on the deck due to one of those library displays that I both drat and keep falling for. This turned out well better than I'd hoped, an extremely active little story that lets the characters just barely get out their conversations before the next twist bang bang shoot shoot. The set up is a cross between X-Men and [b:Wild Cards|147908|Wild Cards |George R.R. Martin|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1172191781s/147908.jpg|1807663], where a very limited number of people, the Greater-Thans, have a "metal integration" much higher than your average person's, allowing then to do things like violate physics and read minds and stuff. Of course, there is a group of good guys, and a group of bad guys, and the bad guys are producing a drug which induces higher integration, yet also has the side effect of making its users batshit insane, or "jokering". Which is what reminded me of Wild Cards, I'll have you know.

As a sort of cross between science fiction and the romance novel, the story occasionally fails the way a compromise can. There are three romantic pairings, an abduction to solve, and a whole Second Great Depression America to sketch here, in addition to fight and love scenes, and that the story hurtles along the way it does is no small feat. While the sex scenes did not gross me out or make me laugh, I was occasionally irritated by the lovers and their simultaneous orgasms - seriously, get out of the damn way, lovers, and explain the mechanism by which the whole "integration" thing works instead of experimenting with bjs.

But! Because of the sometimes romance novel sensibility, Born to Darkness tackles some issues I can't imagine a straight science fiction writer - and I kind of mean the double entendre there - taking on with success. One of the Greater-Thans, the unfortunately nicknamed "Mac", has as one of her powers the ability to thrall sexually any person who swings towards girls. When we meet her, she's full adult and aware of her powers - down to using them seriously unethically, seriously - but as a teen when her powers were first presenting, there was a fair amount of ugliness and violence as people such as her own father - yuck respond to her unwitting transmission of sexual power.

Mostly this backstory is used as an impediment to her romance with hot SEAL dude - the Navy thing, not a selkie. Oh noes! He might love me only for my super-charged vagina! But that the complex relationship between a woman's sexuality and sexual violence was addressed at all was really notable. I was just this afternoon stewing because of some comment threads I read about the recent Walking Dead episode - the one where a character is threatened with rape and sexually assaulted - where some commenters were like, it's realistic that she would be near-raped because obviously men are just waiting for civilization to break down so they can rape to their hearts content. (Of course, leaving aside the realism of walking cannibal corpses, etc.) I just, I mean, I hate the fuck out of this view of both women and men, that justifies sexual violence by conceptualizing male sexuality as this disgusting violent nightmare, and then acting like this view of people is the "reasonable" one. Fuck you assholes. Point being, I guess, that I thought the whole interplay here between sexual violence, coercion, attraction and whatever was an interesting one, even if it was treated kinda topically in the text.

Because this was not wholly science fiction either, I had some irritations with how exactly the Greater-Than thing worked, but then I also get the impression that this is just the first in series, so information will be parceled out as it comes. The mechanism of the magical/scientific powers was certainly better than a lot of PNR I've read, which seems to pull magical rules out of its ass to fit the needs of the romance and not the other way around. (Does that metaphor even work?) The whole post-Depression America thing was kind of a kick, especially because the sensibility seemed a lot less regressive than I usually find in romance novels - the creeping lack of availability of birth control, for example, is seen as the dystopian nightmare it is.

The ending seems to fall off a cliff of dotdotdot next episode next week. But the nice thing about continuing series is that there isn't the need to tie off all relationships into perfected bliss, and the almost downbeat conclusion to some of the romantic plotlines was cool and unexpected. (Especially because I almost wanted to barf, given how happy two of them are. Especially given that mind-reading was in the mix. Maybe I'm just a whole-hearted bitch, but there is no way I want even my own husband of 14 years in my mind ever. That is not romantic to me.) Anyway, pretty brilliant plane read, and probably deserving of another star from me just for sheer enjoyment. Shiny.

Cross-posted on Readerling