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Ceridwen

Ceridwen

You kids get off my lawn. 

The Animal Family - Randall Jarrell, Maurice Sendak I am not going to do this one justice, I know. This is incredibly beautiful, powerful, sad, wonderful stuff. My brilliant friend Georgeanna (and next door neighbor - Lyndale neighborhood represent!) pushed this into my hands when I freaked out about how wonderful The Last Unicorn was. She's right - this is just as amazing, heartbreaking, literate, and poetic as Beagle's stuff. Add in art from Maurice Sendak, and I am in hook, line and sinker.*

I am a land-locked soul, which is funny, because if I have a soul, it resides somewhere on a rocky beach on the north shore of Lake Superior. My soul watches the water, but it can't swim, and spends its time trying skip rocks over the glass of the lake. Maybe this is why I freak out all day about selkie stories - freak out completely beyond the bounds. This isn't necessarily a selkie story - she, who has no name, is referred to as a mermaid - but there's something selkie-ish about the way the hunter and the mermaid find their connection on the spit of land between meadow and sea. Selkie stories** are about miscommunication and alienation and how they can be the basis of love, and how that is the most profound paradox to ever blow my mind.

But she is a mermaid, not a selkie, and that works because selkie stories are usually massive bummers and this is not. I know from reading that if I am ever caught in an undertow, I am to swim at ninety degree angles against the pull, so that I may find myself in still waters. I'm not sure I would remember this if I were caught and drowning, but I know this now on land. I'm not a sea creature, and I can learn through telling, but that knowledge is incomplete and it always will be.

I don't know much about Randall Jarrell. I had this boyfriend once who loved him, and I hair-tossingly did not understand that love. (I was young. Shut up.) I associate him strongly with the WWII poetry that he is best known for:

The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner

From my mother's sleep I fell into the State,
And I hunched in its belly till my wet fur froze.
Six miles from earth, loosed from its dream of life,
I woke to black flak and the nightmare fighters.
When I died they washed me out of the turret with a hose.


I guess he was also a critic, but criticism has a faster expiration date than poetry even. (Sorry, no offense all of Goodreads. We've lit our candles at both ends.)

So a mermaid and a hunter find their strange love on a beach, and then they adopt a family of animals over the years: a bear, a lynx, a human boy. I can't put my finger on why, but I found myself near tears at the oddest of points. And that's weird. This isn't the kind of tale that is determined to work your tear ducts - in fact, it is sweet and comic in its tone - but there's this sorrow to it, an affectionate sorrow, an everyday sorrow, but a sorrow nonetheless. I don't even know how to describe it. Here's a passage, where the lynx is scratching the hunter accidentally in play:

"Velvet paws! velvet paws!" The hunter would cry warningly.

The mermaid had got used to his saying it, but the first time she'd asked perplexedly: "What's velvet?"

"I don't know," the hunter said. "But it's what you say to a cat to get him to keep his claws in. My mother used to say it on the boat." So the hunter said it and the mermaid and the lynx understood it, each in his own way - a little scrap of velvet between the forest and the sea.


Omigod, do you see it? Do you see how this is everyday, happy and sad all in the same smooth movement? I think I may be done reviewing for now. I go to freak out.








*So I can't decide whether I want to use the Oxford comma or not. Sue me.

**I recently saw the movie Ondine, which is a selkie story set in modern Ireland. I loved it like crazy.

Cross-posted on Readerling