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Ceridwen

Ceridwen

You kids get off my lawn. 

Glass Houses - Laura J. Mixon I suffer from intermittent insomnia. I go to bed at the usual hour, no problem, and then awake and squint at the clock which reads something between 2 and 4 and think, “Damn.” After I find my glasses, things are clearer, but I'm still awake. The television is no good at this time of night, although I do play a game where I try to count how many stations are running “Girls Gone Wild” infomercials. The record stands at four. (Not that this has anything to do with the review, but this is the thing I don't get about Joe Francis's titty empire: if you want to buy porn, then why not just buy porn?)

So I read this book in the strange hours between too late and too early, and I was happy for it's company: not overly taxing, stylish, and driving toward some smaller human truth. My step-mom has always used the term “little movies” when she refers to films that set out to accomplish some narrow thing and then succeed; in this way, this book is a “little book.” It was written in the early 90s, and its cyberpunk sensibilities feel worn and frayed, too indebted to its sources to really make the genre new and vital. Mostly, I didn't mind, but then I like cyberpunk. My real complaint is that the stylishness of the setting, the window-dressing of global warming as global apocalypse, the sense of technology driving the breach between haves and have-nots had little to do with the actual emotional heart of the book. Why dress it as cyberpunk at all?

Our protagonist, an agoraphobic scavenger using a proxy-device, almost rescues a very important man from his rather gruesome death. She steals his newly-written will off of his body, and then decides, due to the assholery of his family, to deliver the will to the rightful heir. Well and good; this will serve as plot. The real story is about her coming to terms with her roommate and sometimes lover Melissa. Her relationship with Melissa is the soul of the book, and the thing I responded to the most, even if the revelations felt forced at times, and the protagonist's changes incomplete or untrue. I have fallen in love with users. At some point you realize that unconditional love is something of a trick designed by people who have been keeping score. It's not unfair to count the points yourself.

I say that this is a little book, but I wonder if these things are little at all. It's hard to say. I read this as my twilight self, companioned by the audible silence of the house and my frustrations with my continued awakeness. This is the odd thing I felt when I finished this book: I would have liked this better had it been billed as young adult. It's fun to complain about marketing; I do it all the time. And I don't want to fall into the the trap of thinking fiction written for the younger set is somehow smaller and less important. But there is something fundamentally young in the awakenings found within its pages, a young that isn't naive exactly, but a young that keeps trusting the prostitute she loves despite the obvious metaphorics of her profession. It's a good first book, worthy of a look at Mixon's later work. And a good book for the edgy hours before dawn.

Cross-posted on Readerling