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Ceridwen

Ceridwen

You kids get off my lawn. 

The Hidden Goddess - M. K. Hobson Second verse, same as the first!

Just kidding.

Sort of.

I liked the first of this series, The Native Star, almost despite myself. The opening is rough, like a chainsaw working out the bite into the flesh of the log. But it finds its bite partway through the book in a way that treats American history with respect, even though I wish a little more of that history made it into the book. Or, you know, in a way that mattered.

Second verse, same as the first. By which I mean, this epilogue starts with some seriously interesting stuff about Grant's presidency and alt-history stuff about the sources for the American Civil War, and then, and then, well, nevermind all that! I'm not really complaining, I guess, because Hobson took some things about the first book that I really sparkled on and expanded them - like the effects of gender on the credomancy explained in the first book - the magic of belief - in the character of Miss Jesczenka. I almost wanted her to chuck Emily - our heroine from the first book - and focus on the spectacular Miss Jesczenka, who articulates an astonishingly personal and accurate ambivalence about the experience of being a woman in a misogynist society. Just, good Lord, she's so awesome.

It's not even so much that I'm bagging on Emily - she is a fine main character, with her fish-out-of-water folksy ways - but I felt like the inevitable second book issues between Emily and her paramour, Dreadnought (oh, just barf on the names here, even though they are explained better in this outing) fell into a lot of lameness traps. Emily and Dreadnought (ugh) spend a lot of the first book sniping at each other in that antipathy-is-attraction way, while here, they are kept apart by a bunch of logistics and the occasional bullshit misunderstanding. Some of the misunderstandings were valid - Emily's search for her birth parents, and the varying allegiances and mis-allegiances found and lost by her questings were spot on - but sometimes it was like, ZOMG IMMA MISUNDERSTAND SOMETHING I JUST WALKED IN ON THAT IS EASILY MISCONSTRUED. Bah.

Emily and Dreadnought's (ugh) relationship is never anything more that paint-by-numbers - right down to the argument-ending kisses he plants on her more than once - which, I would like to know if that has ever actually worked for a dude irl. I'm not sure why the wisdom is that lovers have to be kept apart in book two, but I've see it often enough for it to be a thing. Shame, really, because there were a number of developments that I could easily imagine Dreadnought (ugh) and Emily tackling together, because the implications had more than enough potential for conflict between them to arise - real conflicts, rather that logistical bumbling and iffy misunderstandings. The baddie here is so over the top she's maybe hard to take seriously, but certain political situations were neat enough to keep me from focusing on the unreality of the bad guy's motivations.

It's been a while, but I felt like the tone of this book was more consistent, and more consistently goofy than the first, though I do not mean that as a dig. A failing of the first book might be that that it expected me to take some very silly stuff seriously, while here there's some very serious stuff that might have been treated more lightly than it should have been. The question of tone is a tricky one, one that I don't have an easy answers for, though I get the difficulties of managing a story that is equal parts end-of-the-world, banter-y romance, and alt-history. That the tone is managed as well as it is is certainly something.

The ending dot dot dots to a certain kind of romantic completeness, which both irritates and satisfies in equal measures. I went to look for the next book in this series - that's how on the hook I am - and it looks as though the narrative of Emily and her Dreadnought (ugh) will be skipped over to writhe in the stories of their kids. Which, boo a little bit. Given the end, I would like to hear some stuff about how Dreadnought (ugh) deals with...some things, how he copes with losing something fairly vital to his personality. Love is the answer and all, but, as the narrative here says, it's just a start. Too bad that's all we get here.

Cross-posted on Readerling