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Ceridwen

Ceridwen

You kids get off my lawn. 

The Demon Lover - Juliet Dark, Carol Goodman Cross-posted on Readerling

For the last month, I've been working my way through the ridiculous number of NetGalley titles I downloaded in a big frenzy once I remembered I had an account there. Of course I started with the stuff I knew was in my wheelhouse, to very good results. So time to start in on the goofier stuff! I'm generally not looking for taxing on my Sunday on the couch reads (or Sunday on the back porch, in more clement weather), and I figured something called The Demon Lover with that cover would fit the bill. There's a whole passel of books that have more or less that cover, and they tend to be young adult paranormal romance type stuff. Observe:

Die For Me coverAlways a Witch coverFallen coverGrave Mercy cover

I'm not casting aspersions here, just making observations (partially because I have not read any of these books in question.) But given general impressions from reviews of similarly covered books, I figured I knew what I was in for here: young girl, maybe some tragedy in her young life to make her "deep", meet cute with a bad boy/otherworldly creature, sudden love bordering on obsession, lots of angsting and misreading of the classics of Romantic literature. (Sorry to say, kids, but Cathy and Heathcliff can never be made to have a happy ending, and if they do, they are not Cathy and Heathcliff. Character is bloody destiny in that instance.)(Just kidding. I'm not sorry to say it.) But whatever Chardonnay-snorting near-snobbery from me aside, often these kinds of books have a vibrating energy to them, a pulse of often deeply misguided, but very real passion. You can do worse on a Sunday after reading a collection of considered, thoughtful, careful prose. Sometimes I don't want to think but feel.

So it was hugely surprising to me to find a musing, allusive, and referential novel here, complete with affectionate send-ups of academia and an almost matter-of-fact tone. Callie McFay - and I will take this moment to note that the names are awful, across the board - McFay barf is an adjunct professor type who has had some minor success with a Master's-thesis-turned-pop-criticism book about vampires in the contemporary Gothic, and is now figuring out whether to publish or perish. She's got a long-term long-distance bi-coastal relationship, and has obviously read a lot of Bakhtin, Gilbert & Gubar, and Marina Warner. Not that those things are related, making for a terrible sentence from me. Anyway, she decides to go in for a small college in upstate New York because of feelings, and pretty much all of the bitchy things I said would happen come to pass, except for the misreading of the classics part. Ms McFay (barf) has the Gothic classics down. And goddamn right. Oorah.

If I were writing a blurb for this novel, which I would never be asked to do because my sentences heretofore have been for shit, I would say: Pamela Dean's [b:Tam Lin|51106|Tam Lin|Pamela Dean|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1309198667s/51106.jpg|49879] meets [a:Charles de Lint|8456|Charles de Lint|http://d.gr-assets.com/authors/1269735259p2/8456.jpg]'s Newford. On acid. Actually, just kidding about the on acid part; that's just a bad joke about blurbcraft. But The Demon Lover has the everyday boringness (and I mean this mostly kindly) of Dean's college fairy tale, and the nose-picking earnest wonder of de Lint's "North American" this means Canadian city and its denizens. (I kind of can't believe what a bitch I'm being here, and I'm sorry.) I had to swear off reading any more de Lint (except for short fiction) because of inherent blackness in my heart - Newford is just too wonderful for me - so the parts of this that reminded me of that fell flat. But Dean's Blackstone College is pretty much my collegiate soul, so split differences at will.

There are many aside observations here I enjoyed about the contemporary Gothic and its workings, but ultimately the action of the prose didn't do it for me, and I can't figure what the thesis might be, if you'll allow me academical phrasing on this. Ms McFay falls in with an incubus, that soul-sucking Romantic/Gothic fantasy of the perfectly Byronic, tragic dude, and while I appreciated the clear-eyed, innuendo-less conversations about what that might mean, I had a hard time connecting with the emotional stakes. Some of this is tone, which is more sensible than usually found in Gothic romance. But certainly, this could be a function of my long-married pragmatic heart, which doesn't have much patience with dramatic passion with assholes and users anymore. That is too much like work, and the rewards of not being sucked dry and killed by your lover are pretty awesome,especially if you don't have the dress-billowing mania to go along with it. Lest I sound too negative, I do appreciate how this all works out for McFay, and the hard choices she makes, I just...I'm going to have to admit I'm getting old here. Gothic romance is freaking exhausting, which is possibly the take-home message here, which makes this book a little awesome.

So, anyway, enjoyably smart fun, though maybe not the kind of fun advertised on the tin. And I downloaded this because I really wanted to get to [b:The Water Witch|15798085|The Water Witch (Fairwick Chronicles, #2)|Juliet Dark|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1352576194s/15798085.jpg|19200406], whose cover was much more enticing to me. Billowy dresses, you're fine and all, but half-naked chicks rising out of the water? That's the show. We'll see what happens next Sunday on the couch.