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Ceridwen

Ceridwen

You kids get off my lawn. 

Seraphina - Rachel Hartman Cross-posted on Readerling

Rarr. Totally lost my review due to computer problems, and now I'm really ticked off. I'm going to go review something I don't care about as much, and then I'll be back when the pissedoffedness has dwindled.

Okay, I'm back. I think I started off by writing about what kinds of young adult novels work for me, adult reader. Like most genres, it is legion, running from your baldest of wish fulfillment exercises, to post-apocalit and sff more generally, to romance, to topic-driven Public Service Announcement like fare. I know I wrote something about how I don't really like young adult in more contemporary settings, especially if there seems to be some sort of message or topic - though you can blow a giant Melina Marchetta shaped hole in that statement. Now that I've had some time to process, my disinterest in young adult fictions in realistic, contemporary settings isn't specific to young adult. I don't really want to read about a character's round robin of affairs and mid-life crises that you can sometime find in grown-up books, just as I don't want to read about sexting and the effect of parental divorce in something for teens.

I may sound a little dismissive, but I don't really intend that. My interests bend to the fantastic in fiction for a number of reasons, the most easy to explain being the fantastic - and I mean this in the little-f sense; like, not just elves and stuff - can twist the reader's perceptions, throwing in a gravitational mass that affects the usual order of one's personal constellations. To start out with a bad example: Twilight without vampires is a boring tale of a stalker and the woman who loves him. I mean, arguably, it still is that story, but the stakes are higher and the metaphors more disturbingly theological. Or to switch to grown-up books, what does something like The Road read like if transported into a contemporary setting? The wasted America that is the setting for that novel is an emotional reality for the boy and his son, not strictly plausible, but a place to work out the father-son dynamic in a way that isn't possible in a more domestic setting with sippy cups and play dates. To mix my metaphors, the fantastic red-shifts the everyday into something that must be re-calibrated or recolored to see its meaning.

Of course, this red-shift isn't always successful, and I must have a perverse need to undermine my own argument by using one of the more derided examples of YA out there, one whose pleasures are described as guilty even by its defenders. But I'm simply trying to note where my interests, as a reader, lie, and why. The fantastic can be a place for writers to camouflage authorial insert or blatant wish fulfillment - the parameters of the universe of the book bending inexorably to the needs of the protagonist/authorial-proxy/reader-proxy. This conflation of the protagonist and reader may work more often in young adult, as the creation, management and fulfillment of wishes is an important part of learning who you are. I can see why such universes would resonate - I would like the universe to bend to my will as much as the next girl - but I get a little squirmy when it's too blatant. When the fantastic shift works, it captures the heightened emotional reality of life though the impossible and the unlikely. My often roiling internal state owes nothing to strict reality.

Oh Gawd! I remember how my review started before! (I swear, this review is turning out be remember that one time I wrote a review that was no doubt AWESOME but it got eaten by my computer; alas.) I mentioned this scene in the b-grade horror film Ginger Snaps - which is about a pair of near-pubescent sisters, one of whom is bitten by a werewolf at the start of the movie. Her changes are looked upon with distress by her younger sister - staying out too late, hanging out with a different, more jerkish crowd, expressing an interest in sex that didn't exist before. The younger sister goes to the school nurse early in the film and lays out the changes - she's growing hair on weird parts of her body! - and is met with a politely condescending speech about how she, too, will go through the changes of puberty, and is given an embarrassing pamphlet. I love this scene because it gestures to the obvious way the metaphor of lycanthropy is being used - this movie is about puberty, both the physical and mental changes - but the dismissal of the profundity of those changes by an authority figure is both enraging, and not just a little bit funny. Puberty, while you're going through it, is the end of the freaking world, and the metaphor of the werewolf is a better capture of the feelings of that time than the bloodless facts.

So, finally - sheesh - I can start talking about this book. I've mentioned a couple of monsters that show up in fictions of the adolescent - werewolves, vampires - but the monster, the metaphor here is dragons. I'm too lazy to do an exhaustive search of the dragon in literature, and will instead rely on my limited experience, but the dragon doesn't lend itself to tidy summation. Like werewolves, they are often understood to have divided motivations - fiercely intelligent, but with a bestial nature that humans like to evade. (See the dragons in A Wizard of Earthsea, Grendel, or The Hobbit) They tend toward inhuman scheming and their murderousness is almost droll - we kill to live, they say, why do you pretend you don't, ape?

Seraphina lives in world where humans and dragons were at war forty years before, and the peace, such as it is, is fragile. Seraphina has come to her near adulthood in a place where her divided allegiances are not just uncomfortable, but dangerous, and the way she guards her body and her self, even with people she aches to connect with, is so vividly true. She's a talented girl, her talents as much the result of practice as they are of some innate competence - which is my favorite kind of talent - the earned one. There's a lot about music in this novel, which works beautifully in the ways emotions can be expressed in the non-verbal, especially when the verbal is impossible.

The plot of the book is court intrigue murder mystery - a prince of the realm is found sans head in a way that points to the involvement of dragons. If this had been the focus of the book, emotionally, I would have been politely bored, the way I am with court intrigue. But the bald facts of the plot are mechanical, and you watch that architecture unfold through the strange parallax of Seraphina's bisected vision. But this isn't the world bending to her; this the world seen through her, and it's wonderful.

I don't want to get too far into it for fear of spoilers, but I will say that I loved so so many of the secondary characters. There's a girl, a friend, whose laughing ease is in sharp contrast with Seraphina's discomfort, but she is not cut down or diminished simply because she is not like the protagonist. She has a moment, late in the book, overcome with grief and weeping, and she pulls her head up, and says, I'm doing this now so I don't have to do this later, and you want to reach out and hold her, and you understand her matter-of-fact-ness in grief. That's a character moment a less generous author would not have given to a girl other than the heroine.

There's a boy, a friend, who shares affinities with, and is angered by Seraphina in equal measures - who understands as far as he can, but is hamstrung by Phina's dissembling. He is not there to make her look good, or make her look bad, but has his own credible motivations, and life outside of Seraphina's existence. The worst of young adult fictions - of any fictions - cast the opposite gender friend as a prop, as an extension, and it's so beautiful to see one who is a character in his own right.

And family - there is an uncle here who is such a fascinating creature, though again, I don't want to get into it too far for fear of spoilers. I do have some reservations about the way Seraphina's father was portrayed - his reservations and near-absence felt...tidy, or possibly convenient - though the trajectory of her relationship with the uncle in many ways stands in for the paternal relationship in a way that made emotional sense, even if it didn't exactly make concrete sense. And the absence/presence of the mother...the way that relationship was expressed through the fantastic - Seraphina's mother died in childbirth, but her memories were encoded in an emotional mechanism - that completely worked for me.

I'm running out of steam, which is too bad, because there are plenty of other things to note about this world - the sweetness of Seraphina and one of her friends talking imaginary philosophers, like you do when you're sort of showing off your first year of college, but showing off in a way that's incredibly important at the time; the system of saints in this culture, and the way those saints are used and understood; the strange near-dragons who literally stuff themselves on the edges of this world, a mystery that no one is watching; the sly humor that is throughout this book, such a happy thing to find in capital-f Fantasy stories, because so often they are so dead serious that they invite ridicule.

Such a good book. Such a smart book. Such a good metaphor for the experience of growing up, my discomfort and unease, but also my blinding moments of connection and ultimately prosaic, but completely shattering revelations. I wish that I could have read this at 17, and that's high praise, even though I sometimes make fun of 17 year old me now. On some level, she's reading this anyway, because it's not like my younger self is a completely vanished creature, but someone there just behind my eyes. The best young adult books call her forth and respect her. Oh man.




(I received an ARC from netgalley.com, and I have been friends with Rachel Hartman on Goodreads for while now, for full disclosure. Neither NetGalley nor Rachel offered me cookies or anything for a good review, and all opinions are decidedly my own.)