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Ceridwen

Ceridwen

You kids get off my lawn. 

Engine Summer - John Crowley Cross=posted on Readerling

This book lit up all the parts of my brain that love Ursula K. Le Guin. The story takes place in a far-future American landscape, long after the end of modern life, so long that the world is green and pastoral, its people living out their lives in small, knitted communities, their concerns more of the soul than the rat race. It's not dissimilar from the people and places in City of Illusions or Always Coming Home, and much of my reading pleasures converged here: the Road, crumbling and cracking under the thrust of the roots of new trees, the skeletons of bridges both dangerous and beautiful, a generation from falling to orange dust, the quiet nosings into the past (our present) with a kind of wonder and dismay.

The image of the mobius recurs in this novel, the strip of paper twisted and then bound so that if you trace your finger, there is no end. Perfect, because this book ends in such a way you must, you absolutely must loop back around and read the beginning with fresh eyes, with the knowledge you have picked up along the way. It kills, this reversal, absolutely slays. It's morose and sad and hopeful all in the same. Jesus.

This is the thing I noticed when I read this book: we've lost our taste for utopias. Because even in all of the sadness and grieving in this book, there is a very earnest attempt to imagine livable societies, societies that work, societies that are decent. I went just now and looked up all the publication dates for the books I just mentioned, and they are solidly all before the turn of the millennium. You could, probably without much thought, rattle off a dozen dystopias - which, why the hell doesn't spellcheck recognize this word? - but utopias? We don't even try anymore.

The utopias here aren't perfect, and by needs any (good) story has to find the fracture in the societal system and widen it, but, I guess I'm just wistful for writers, and readers, trying to find hope in these apocalyptic ashes. The best of us is as important as the worst of us. Which is not to say that I didn't smile bitchily about a lot of the assumptions about human nature here. There's a chasteness about human sexuality I found puzzling - the main character is a boy between the ages of 14 and 17 through this novel, half-chasing a girl who makes choices he can't, or won't - and I couldn't figure out how far their relationship went, in concrete, carnal terms, which seems an notable lacuna. Seems chivalrous in a way I find politely repellent.

Crowley walks you through three societies, and a fourth in the oblique: the warren-bound Truth Speakers, the people of Dr Boots's List, and the avvengers. The Truth Speakers are the soul of this book, and as you as reader pass through the others, you see it. Truth speaking is never defined, but emerges in the edges of the narrative, a felt truth. It's both beautiful and hopelessly naive, the way these things are, and absolutely cut with how truth won't get you happiness necessarily, and right living is maybe only understood in its absence.

The sad thing is most of the way through this review, I haven't even talked about what I wanted to talk about when I was reading: all the groaning puns and funny translations of modern terms - Nu Yeork - one of which informs the title here. Or the long winter spent by the protagonist under the effect of a drug that induces hibernation, or the alien plants harvested and smoked, or the rings on Mbaba's toes. This is a book for the experiencing of it, all these long sentences and these repeated refrains, like a song. The best of us is as important as the worst of us, and so are the rest of us, in the middle. Hot damn.