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Ceridwen

Ceridwen

You kids get off my lawn. 

Unholy Magic - Stacia Kane Before I set into bitching - this is going to be the review for this series where I lay out my gripes with this world - I want to make sure I underline how much fun I've had reading these books. There are more than three at this point, but the first three seem to constitute an emotional arc. While I'll probably check the others at some point, my lost weekend of slamming through the Downside Ghosts series is done since I just closed the third book a couple minutes ago.

So, as a middle in a trilogy, or even as a second in a series of books, this one is going to lag a little on the enjoyment level. Kane is very consistent in her writing style and plotting, which I count as a good thing - but consistency is the hobgoblin of readers getting a little wearied of certain things. As a second book, you're not in that sparkle of new environments and the rush of new characters. You're at that point in the relationship where you start noticing how your new beau has a tendency to snore or to clear his throat all the freaking time seriously what is that? The opening half is characterized by a lot of wheel spinning and the solving of mysteries I don't care about, which brings me to the next thing.

Chess Putnam is a ghostbuster is a profoundly alternate history. In 1997 there was a ghostacalypse which tore down every religious and governmental institution we know. All institutions were replaced by The Church, a mystical but ultimately non-theistic order which is the only thing that can keep the ghosts at bay. One the one hand, it's just fine to gesture to this profound upheaval, running your characters from their limited perspectives from street level, a street level I found richly detailed and, well, just cool. On the other, oh, come on. While I appreciate the lack of infodumps - well, Bob, you recall how the Elders of the Church formed a council which blahblahblah - sometimes the haziness was a little too hazy. Even when paying pretty close attention, I don't really get how this whole ghost thing works, exactly, and there was more than one occasion where Chess would be in a dire magical situation and be like, oh, yeah, if I do this thing it'll neutralize this other thing, and wheee! Now I'm out of that scrape. It's not so much that the magic was inconsistent, it's that I didn't know enough about how it worked to do anything but roll my eyes and think, well, that's convenient. Which is not to say that Chess doesn't continue to be one of my favorite fuckups in urban fantasy.

The opening mystery is one of those locked houses with a bunch of perverse rich sickos. Which is fine or whatever, but it took maybe longer than necessary for this to snick up with the other plot line, because you totes know it will. As I've said before, this is pretty straightforward detective Noir plotting, where everything is going to brew up into one giant clusterfuck. And whoo boy, when it does, the cluster fucks so godamn hard. Even while loving Chess as a character, she's not a good person, and her failings come home to get her in a powerfully awful way. She's a junkie, and while I didn't think this ran entirely convincingly in the first book, there's a withdrawal sequence here which had ants running all over my joints. Gah. But that sequence is just a warm up to her serious comeuppance for betrayals that you can dig why she did them, but oh, Lordy, being the betrayer is no fun park. Specially when you get caught out.

Oh, and, quick edit, I'm on record as having a boner for city stories, ones that write a city as character. Triumph City, and its underside, the Downside, is really compelling to me. I like its markets and orphans and physicality. I like how Chess talks about neighborhood, the Street, the interactions of the poor and destitute, the ways the rich are insulated and clueless. Much as I love Downside, the fact that this must be a recognizable American city rankled me a bit. Is this DC? Where the fuck are we? I noticed this more in this book, with its casual chatter about LA and Hollywood. And, can we talk about the City of Ghosts? Is this place accessible from any city in the world? Or just in Triumph City? What happened in Russia during Haunted Week? Again, I'm not really complaining - this book is about the concerns of a person, and her concerns aren't about the global experience of the ghostacalypse. But it would be sweet if this were addressed even sorta passingly.

And, I would have really liked there to be at least one lady in this whole world other than Chess. There's some bitchy librarian types and some dead whores, a psycho wife and a teenage daughter, but none of these women matter. Or they don't really matter to Chess. This is pretty common in urban fantasy, or in romance more generally - the lone chick in a world of dudes - but it's bunk to fail the Bechdel test no matter what the gender of the writer, no matter what the gender of the protagonist. (Aside on the Bechdel test - yes, this was developed for movies; yes, it's not a measure of quality; yes, it's not exactly fair to bring this up in a very specific instance. It's a statistical test, a way of polling the relevance of women's relationships within a genre. Which is why I get so disappointed when I see fucking sweet ass characters, girl characters who have real personalities and failings, written by sweet ass women writers whom I respect a good deal and still have those sweet ass characters only exist in a world where women don't talk, don't have real relationships.) Which is not to say this book doesn't deal sensitively and convincingly with certain touchy subjects that are alarmingly common in women's experience, things like the legacy and recovery from rape, prostitution and trafficking, and some other dire ass shit. The experience of women does matter in this world, which is why it seems notable that Chess doesn't have even one ladyfriend at all.

Anyway, blahblah, feminist hobbyhorse aside, this is an incredibly fun series, and the slackness of the early sections of this book give way to some really knuckle biting conflict, conflict that won't rightly be resolved until the next book. Not that is is uncompleted - the locked house mystery comes to its little end - but the trajectory of Chess's betrayals is still mid-arc. I kinda like downbeat, uncompleted endings, hanging in a welter of shame and survival, but mileage varies. I can say the next book deals with that stuff in a satisfying way to me, but that's a retroactive assessment, fwiw. Booyah.