421 Followers
371 Following
Ceridwen

Ceridwen

You kids get off my lawn. 

Steampunk! An Anthology of Fantastically Rich and Strange Stories - Holly Black, Cassandra Clare, Delia Sherman, Shawn Cheng, Elizabeth Knox, Dylan Horrocks, Kathleen Jennings, Ysabeau S. Wilce, Gavin J. Grant, Cory Doctorow, Kelly Link, M.T. Anderson, Libba Bray, Garth Nix, Christopher Rowe Cross-posted on Readerling

A cromulent collection of short stories, though uneven like most (maybe all) multi-author collections. I do appreciate the emphasis by editor Kelly Link. Seven deadly sins in comic form with perplexing steampunk ornament and terrible lettering. At least it's short.

"Hand in Glove" by Ysabeau S. Wilce. Not really to my taste, but a goodhearted little story. Cwmlech Manor is haunted by the ghost of the once mistress of the manor, killed in the English Civil War by Cavaliers looking for loot. The main character is a plucky girl type, who is pragmatic about her romanticism.

Best of all, I loved the story that went with Elizabeth Knox. Another short story that ends right before it should get interesting, where the real conflicts are going to begin. I don't feel as irritated by this as the Clare short story, because at least this world is aiming for something more than pretty but useless. This is one of those post-apocalyptic utopias that no one bothers to write anymore - two generations past peak oil in a fiercely local America. A boy in a car, of all things, shows up in town, which kicks over a bunch of anthills. Given how bound up in our national identity the automobile is, it was interesting to consider the American landscape without them.

"Finishing School" by Kathleen Jennings. Another comic. Slender reimagining of the invention of flight, this time by a daughter of Scottish and Chinese parents who is stuck in an Australian school for girls. Nice metaphors of girlish exuberance. When a friend's mom got divorced, she took Amelia as a middle name. We long for flight sometimes, and sometimes we should get it.

"Steam Girl" by [a:Dylan Horrocks|42127|Dylan Horrocks|http://d.gr-assets.com/authors/1330197652p2/42127.jpg]. I think I'm going to call this one out as the stand out of this collection. A nerdy, chubby boy semi-befriends a poor, outcast girl. She tells him stories of Steam Girl, an obvious self-avatar grown long-limbed and beautiful in her pulpy imaginings. Horrocks has a good sense of the teenage outcast - not the romantic one, with his bangs in his eyes, but the real kind: uncomfortable in his body, clueless, and slightly horndoggish, but not in a particularly nasty or cruel way. Escapism is important for people who have something to escape from, and this story is so sensitive to that equation.

"Everything Amiable and Obliging" by [a:Holly Black|25422|Holly Black|http://d.gr-assets.com/authors/1261867163p2/25422.jpg]. Fine, I guess, but I don't think all the implications of the central metaphors here were considered, so I feel all squicky in the end. A girl falls in love with a house automaton, and her family tries to dissuade her from her love of the dancing instructor robot. He's part of the hive consciousness of the house, and there's a lot of shouting and stuff about loving robots designed to give you exactly what you want. That's not the squick part for me. The squick part was when this was equated with the other girl's lack of agency in her own relationships, and then my brain started shouting, but wait! Are we characterizing the working class as automata? Are we really saying girls lack agency? I can see where Black was going with this, I just don't think it was thought out enough.

"The Oracle Engine" by [a:M.T. Anderson|31688]. A Roman steampunk story. And not modern Roman, but the Classical kind. Holy shit, but this was fun. Written in that gossipy historian's voice, the one that relates a bunch of folklore and quotes the classics, and then pulls back demurely and says there isn't any basis for that conjecture. I was fully expecting a Mechanical Turk at the center of this story, which, if you are not familiar with the concept, was a chess-playing engine invented in the 18th C, but turned out to be a dude hiding in a box and not an automaton at all. (Amazon has named it's crowd-sourcing venture after this, and this enterprise is why capchas have gotten so freaking annoying.) That would have been neat, but the actual center of the story is so much cooler and weirder. GIGO.

Oh, and also? The scientific ornament was brilliant. Archimedes almost invented calculus, for crissakes, and while there's no guarantees that the lunatics of the Middle Ages wouldn't have lost his discoveries - like they did with how to make concrete - had Archimedes's discoveries become widely known, it is a fun thought experiment to consider.