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Ceridwen

Ceridwen

You kids get off my lawn. 

The Hound of the Baskervilles - Martin Powell, Patrick Thorpe, Jamie Chase,  Arthur Conan Doyle So, in interests of full disclosure, I'm "friends" with Jamie Chase who did the art in The Hound of the Baskervilles. I shouldn't even scare quote that, because it could come off as bitchy. I've met him several times at Bubonicon, I'm friends with him on facebook, and I'm a pretty enthusiastic fangirl of his art style, but we're not, like, borrowing each other's clothes. He's pretty awesome though, and I had a conversation with him and a bunch of other folk maybe two years ago about this Sherlock Holmes comic he was about to start work on. So I totally squeed when I saw the finished product on Netgalley. I remember when! That never happens for me.

My art education is pretty heterodox. I worked as a picture framer for nearly two decades, so I have a scatterdash education in print-making techniques so I could identify a lithograph from a giclée - which, fun fact, the word giclée comes from the French word for "spray", referring to the spray of ink from an ink jet printer. No one has any idea what's going to happen with ink jet ink in 50 years - it might just fall apart or go blue like photographs - so art buyer beware on that front. Not that this has anything to do with anything, and the point of this paragraph is supposed to be about how I deal with art.

You frame an incredible amount of populist garbage as a picture framer, so just because I never had an academic education, doesn't mean I believe the line that fine art world is out of touch with human emotion and too avant garde for its own sake or something. I mean, yes, the fine art world is this ridiculous circle jerk, but popular couch art is depressing too. I ended up gravitating toward abstract and genre art in my second decade framing, and I super appreciate people like Jamie Chase, who are doing these really odd things with vernacular, stuff that looks initially like a straight take, but there's this cloaked subversion in it. God, I love his stuff so much.

So, anyway, I also have some deeply held beliefs about Sherlock Holmes. I read the absolute crap out of every single word Conan-Doyle had on the subject when I was a teen, in addition to some words other writers had on the subject too. (Like the series by local historian Larry Millett, which has Holmes solving fun Minnesota mysteries like in [b:Sherlock Holmes and the Ice Palace Murders|2182509|Sherlock Holmes and the Ice Palace Murders|Larry Millett|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1266613382s/2182509.jpg|2188197].) Holmes, more than a lot of writing which gets fan-fictioned to death (like Jane Austen, for example), lends itself to adaption. Holmes is a pulp serial, and Conan-Doyle himself was seriously lax about chronology and canon. Watson took a bullet magically in both his shoulder and his leg while he was a doc in Afghanistan. You can fall into some serious nerd-fests trying to determine how many times Watson married and when exactly everything happened. Which is hilarious, because obviously Conan-Doyle was writing everything half-drunk, banging it out on a cost-per-word basis. There's something brilliant about his slovenly prose, the way it rushes and jumps. The number of times he uses the word "ejaculate" to mean "exclaim" is enough to twss the modern reader into teh funnies. But Conan-Doyle's prose fairly hurtles, immaturity aside, which makes a graphic adaption that excises most of the text a little sad.

[b:The Hound of the Baskervilles|8921|The Hound of the Baskervilles (Sherlock Holmes, #5)|Arthur Conan Doyle|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1355929358s/8921.jpg|3311984] is an odd case, because it's so incredibly famous, so iconic, but it's not real typical of Holmes. Or, you know it is in the sense that Holmes tends to be really idiosyncratic. For one, Holmes stories tend to be urban, situated in the colonial crush or London, but there are a couple out in the Gothic hinterland, like the one with the bicycle or the one with the snake. (Sorry, I'm not bothering to look up their real titles.) So there's precedent. The weird part is how focused on Watson Hound is - how he's left without Holmes for ages in the moors. Sherlock takes Watson down at the very beginning with the trick with the walking stick, and it's pretty funny how that works - the authorial intervention of Holmes's interpretive dick-move unsettling everything Watson observes in the later plot.

Because, the other thing about Hound is how soapy it is, how domestically Gothic. Stripped of the Doylian prose (sorry for this adjective), Hound reads really Scooby Doo, what with the land deal mechanics of the plot and the fact you meet the villain straight away. (Spoiler alert, sort of, but there are very few characters here, in true Gothic style, and the red herrings are telegraphed in flaming semaphore.) So, on a technical level, I think a graphic version of Hound is a little hamstrung, especially one as faithful as this one, because the whole thing reads sillier than it does long form, what without all of Watson's ejaculations.

What? God! Why do you have to be so immature!

Chase's art is really sepia, with all the color bled out, and it took me a while to embrace it. I'm on record as a fangirl, but sometimes I have to be lead to the water before I drink. I was expecting something more Frazetta-pulp, more kaleidoscopic, because I think this would really work with stuff like [b:The Sign of Four|608474|The Sign of Four (Sherlock Holmes, #2)|Arthur Conan Doyle|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1299346921s/608474.jpg|21539872] what with its blow-darting aborigines and evil Mormons, etc, etc. But we're in Goth-land here, and the Gothic is the world of the scary, soapy, reaction-shot close-up, and that's what Chase delivers. Dude knows what I want before I want it. <3

So, anyway, I enjoyed this take on Holmes, but I think it's a little hobbled by how the source material translates to the image, even with images as strong as this. I felt like the libretto - or whatever it's called in comics - spent a lot of time hitting the obvious, quotable stuff in Holmes - the game is afoot! elementary! - while kinda missing the stuff that really makes Holmes the shit. But I seriously, seriously can't wait for other Holmes adaptions from this team, because I think given this practice, they could come up with something mind-blowing. Eeee!

Cross-posted on Readerling