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Ceridwen

Ceridwen

You kids get off my lawn. 

The Assassin's Curse - Cassandra Rose Clarke Cross-posted on Readerling

I have a challenge question if you send me a friend request on Goodreads, which is, "What is the best book you read in the last year and why?" There are no right answers - in the sense that if your best book is something I loathe I won't hold it against you - and I don't really care what your definition of "best" is. Best can be a lot of different things. Pretty regularly, friend requesters turn it around on me, and that makes me throw up my hands. What kind of jerk question is that? Gosh, how can I be expected to answer that?

According to the stats, I have rated 36 books since the beginning of the year, and of them, eight I gave five stars. (I admit I've become soft in my ratings, but then I do read less dross.) But of that eight, I'd call [a:Cassandra Rose Clarke|5331983|Cassandra Rose Clarke|http://d.gr-assets.com/authors/1335470053p2/5331983.jpg]'s [b:The Mad Scientist's Daughter|13642704|The Mad Scientist's Daughter|Cassandra Rose Clarke|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1350000325s/13642704.jpg|18229799] the best. She managed to punch through my rib cage and strangle me with that one, with the kind of science fiction that uses technology as folklore in the long, unsaid tides of lived lives. Just, oh my god. I knew Clarke had a YA novel, [b:The Assassin's Curse|13533650|The Assassin's Curse (The Assassin's Curse, #1)|Cassandra Rose Clarke|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1335967954s/13533650.jpg|18229805], but I have to be in a very specific mood for YA fantasy. But then the sequel, [b:The Pirate's Wish|15714476|The Pirate's Wish (The Assassin's Curse, #2)|Cassandra Rose Clarke|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1352903412s/15714476.jpg|21383294], came up on NetGalley, I freaked right out and requested it. And then I read both books - which constitute a duology - in one huge freak-out sitting. (I would like to thank the ugly head cold I got for giving me the time prone to do that.)

Ananna of the Tanarau is a pirate's daughter betrothed to a semi-landlocked idiot at the start of the action. She manages to mess that up fairly spectacularly, and ends up on the lam, chased by magical assassins set after her by her would-be-husband's family. Ananna reminded me a little of Saba from [b:Blood Red Road|9917938|Blood Red Road (Dust Lands, #1)|Moira Young|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1293651959s/9917938.jpg|14692536], both with her clueless competence and her near-dialect, but both her character and the dialect was more restrained, and for the better. She ends up tied to one of the assassins through magical weirdness, and she and the assassin, Naji, end up scrambling all over this world in an attempt to untether their destinies and break the curse.

Which, gotta say, written out like that, this book sounds a little trite, and certainly [b:The Assassin's Curse|13533650|The Assassin's Curse (The Assassin's Curse, #1)|Cassandra Rose Clarke|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1335967954s/13533650.jpg|18229805] isn't reinventing the wheel in terms of young adult or magical systems. I'm pretty sure I've said this elsewhere, but originality doesn't necessarily factor for me in young adult slash fantasy fiction; whether I like a book of this nature comes down to whether I like the protagonist. I like Ananna a lot. She's got ambition, and a mind, and she's both emotionally reactive and measured. She factors the angles and leaps, or she leaps and then factors the angles, and she's neither always making the right choice nor being overcome by hard choices.

Maybe it's all the sailing, but [b:The Assassin's Curse|13533650|The Assassin's Curse (The Assassin's Curse, #1)|Cassandra Rose Clarke|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1335967954s/13533650.jpg|18229805] reminded me a little of Ursula K Le Guin's Earthsea books. Especially the odd, inhuman character of the manticore, whose brutal predation was both funny and scary - not unlike Le Guin's dragons. There's a lot of action in [b:The Assassin's Curse|13533650|The Assassin's Curse (The Assassin's Curse, #1)|Cassandra Rose Clarke|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1335967954s/13533650.jpg|18229805], and often really strange action, occurring in magical locales with weird physics, and Clarke manages this all well. (And I think physical scenes can be deceptively hard to write.) The magical systems aren't really tightly defined, but I didn't mind. This isn't some wank about how the world works, but about how people work within the world, and that Ananna knows what she knows but doesn't know everything made perfect sense to me.

The ending kind of dot-dot-dots in a way that is not the best, if you're into self-contained fictions, but I had the sequel in my hot little hands, so it was okay for me. Not to start reviewing the sequel, but [b:The Pirate's Wish|15714476|The Pirate's Wish (The Assassin's Curse, #2)|Cassandra Rose Clarke|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1352903412s/15714476.jpg|21383294] didn't exactly deliver on the promise of this novel, but it still wasn't a bad conclusion. For what it's worth.