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Ceridwen

Ceridwen

You kids get off my lawn. 

The Pirate's Wish - Cassandra Rose Clarke Cross-posted on Readerling

[b:The Pirate's Wish|15714476|The Pirate's Wish (The Assassin's Curse, #2)|Cassandra Rose Clarke|https://d202m5krfqbpi5.cloudfront.net/books/1352903412s/15714476.jpg|21383294] is the completion of the duology started with [b:The Assassin's Curse|13533650|The Assassin's Curse (The Assassin's Curse, #1)|Cassandra Rose Clarke|https://d202m5krfqbpi5.cloudfront.net/books/1335967954s/13533650.jpg|18229805]. The author's afterword notes this is a duology because [b:The Assassin's Curse|13533650|The Assassin's Curse (The Assassin's Curse, #1)|Cassandra Rose Clarke|https://d202m5krfqbpi5.cloudfront.net/books/1335967954s/13533650.jpg|18229805] got too long, so the book was bisected, and it shows. The first novel doesn't end satisfactorily, and this one feels dissipated, bled out into the more wangsty concerns of the bildungsroman.

This is functionally the third act of the coming of age novel, and third acts are the parts of coming of age that I like least, ending, as they often do, in sentiment. Which is not to say that I didn't enjoy much of this novel, the characters, and the choices Clarke makes on a narrative level, just that maybe it could have been more ruthlessly edited to be a single novel. Young adult readers aren't afraid of doorstoppers, bless their hearts, though I am cognizant that they are more likely to pick them up if the author is named Meyer or Rowling, and not a first time novelist. So I get it.

The first book details how Ananna, a pirate's daughter, flees from an arranged marriage out into the world without much more than her ambition and wit to get by. She's a likable protagonist, competent in many ways (ways such as pick-pocketing, which is badass) but also a little naive. So, you know, like someone you knew or were or wanted to be. (Pick-pocketing!) She ends up with her fate tied to the assassin Naji through a curse, and an odd one. In the terms of the book, an impossible one. Naji cannot abide having Ananna in any kind of danger, or have her move too far away from him without pain - real, physical pain.

It's an interesting wrinkle, because put that way, that reads a little like the crazy instalove mania that you find in a lot of both young adult and adult romances, where lovers cannot be parted and the hero must stalk and pedestal the heroine for her own good and his. But that's not Naji and Ananna's relationship. He's a little scarred and mysterious, sure, but he maintains his rationality in spite of the curse, and doesn't treat Ananna like a child. Or not exactly like a child; he is still sometimes high-handed, but it reads as age-gap and not jerk ownership of Ananna.

Possible spoilers for the first book ahead.

Ananna and Naji are given a series of metaphorically vague tasks to complete in order to break the curse, one of which is something to the effect of true love's kiss. Which, despite the fact that Naji and Ananna are not eye-gazing or spooning, you pretty much know is going to be between the two of them. So it's a cool choice that Clarke makes to dispense with that oracular kiss in a confounding and complicating way: she may love him, but he does not love her, and everyone becomes harshly aware of it when the first task is completed. Bummer.

But even though I kinda appreciate the whole confounding the expectations thing, it makes Ananna and Naji's relationship a whole bunch of annoyance from this point on. She deals with this revelation reasonably well, in that she doesn't fall apart or become a dishrag, but there's still far more blubbering and storming off than I prefer. Naji, who has the whole mysterious scarred assassin thing going for him in book one, starts pouting and hanging out in his room in a way that diminishes his character. And while there's something touching about the restraint in explicating his back story - a person is not just the story of how he got his scars - it makes it hard to understand his motivations. But! I do adore a lot of the characters here, even if Naji is not my favorite. The manticore and her kin are wonderful, and the lesbian queen and her pirate consort are pretty much the best ever.

The final task is kind of a mess. Not in the way it's written, which is beautiful and odd, but just in how it plays out. Why and how did that happen at all? But I did appreciate the final conclusion between Naji and Ananna, which took their characters into account in a way I rarely see when dealing with romantic couples. By way of avoiding spoilers, I'll just gesture to the Norse legend of Skaði, a goddess of hunt and woods, who must choose a husband only by the look of his feet. She chooses Njörðr, a deity of the sea. Their relationship is always going to be a compromise - sea or woods - and while love may be transformative and all, it probably won't change your basic nature. It is very cool to see a young adult novel not magic away very real, character-based conflicts between people - something that happens even in stories that are not literally magical. Nice.

So, a nice conclusion on the story, but not as awesome as the first two acts. I want to say this could have been tighter and less peripatetic, but then I liked the shaggy bopping around of [b:The Assassin's Curse|13533650|The Assassin's Curse (The Assassin's Curse, #1)|Cassandra Rose Clarke|https://d202m5krfqbpi5.cloudfront.net/books/1335967954s/13533650.jpg|18229805]. Maybe I just don't like coming of age, as a brutal, cheerful pirate's daughter is way more fun than one who has been tempered and changed. Good story though.

I received an ARC through NetGalley and Strange Chemistry, and thank them kindly.