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Ceridwen

Ceridwen

You kids get off my lawn. 

Throne of the Crescent Moon - Saladin Ahmed Cross-posted on Readerling

I am going to begin somewhat uncharitably by making fun of the cover for this book. Now, I know covers ain't content, and usually authors have close to zero say in cover choice, so I'm not making fun of Ahmed here. However:

The cover for Crescent Moon, which has very cartoony looking D&D people looking boss

Seriously.

I showed this cover to my husband and asked, "Where's the Disney singing sidekick?" At which point he retorted, "Is that Mel Brooks?" But snarking hipsterism aside, the cover is kinda perfect, because [b:Throne of the Crescent Moon|11487807|Throne of the Crescent Moon (The Crescent Moon Kingdoms, #1)|Saladin Ahmed|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1344256189s/11487807.jpg|14520797] feels like very old school, summer vacation reading, sword-and-sandals fantasy, the kind of thing little Ceridwen would stay up reading past her bedtime because OMG, it's the end of the world! and also maybe some fart jokes; lol; he said fart. The cover conveys that pretty well, as does the completely forgettable title which feels like it was spat out of the Random Fantasy Novel Title Generator. It's just sad, is all, because the title and cover are so stock fantasy, and I think the book itself is maybe more interesting than the cover implies? Maybe not, because I can't say I more than liked this, and I only read it because I'm trying to get through the 2012 Nebula nominees before May 18th when they announce the winners. (Kim Stanley Robinson: why did I leave your doorstopper for last?)

So Doctor Aboulla Makhslood is the last of the ghul-hunters, a wheezy, fat old man with a cheerless, devout dervish apprentice. Abdoulla is definitely getting too old for this shit, but not so old he can't enjoy giving his apprentice a hard time and opening up a can of whup-ass on some ghuls. The story starts with Abdoulla's old flame asking for some help in the deaths of some of her kin, and Abdoulla saddles up the donkey and heads out. Abdoulla's very much like your kinda racist teasing old uncle, who talks a lot of shit but is essentially a good guy. If only he would STFU about how much he loves living in New York.

There's a getting-the-band-back-together feel of the opening, which has Abdoulla and his dour dervish meeting up with a badass Cheetara vengeance girl, finding their purpose - we must find the ghul-of-ghuls! - and then chatting over tea with Abdoulla's neighbors and friends, who just happen to be an alkemist and a mage. Wonder fantasy team activate! There's a lot of street-fighting and Robin Hoody folk characters, dire magic, out of touch Khalifs and civil unrest, and everything winds up to a pretty perfunctory meeting with a Big Boss - zap! pflash! - complete with moral compromises and the like. Super fantasy friends to the rescue! Huzzah!

I told myself I wasn't going to be a quipping jerk in this review, and I see I've failed at that completely. Let me start again.

There is a lot I liked about [b:Throne of the Crescent Moon|11487807|Throne of the Crescent Moon (The Crescent Moon Kingdoms, #1)|Saladin Ahmed|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1344256189s/11487807.jpg|14520797], the primary thing being its cranky old main character and his cranky old friends. It's neat to see a fat old grouch grouse his way through a plot usually left to the young and beautiful, people like his pious apprentice and cat-changing-girl. He scores a lot of points off of their youthful naivete, even if it occasionally seems unfair that they seem to be written to bear Abdoulla's bon mots. It's also too bad the dervish and the cat-changing-girl are so thinly written, especially the supposed sexual tension between the two of them. I believe that not at all, and none of the ethical conflict the dervish experienced rang true to me.

I also enjoyed the...how do I put this?...religiosity of the characters? Abdoulla and his old friends are cynical, urbane folk who have little faith in institutions or even human nature, and this rubs up against the youthful piety and certainty of the younger characters. But, Abdoulla still has a complicated and dynamic engagement with his religion and his faith, even while it's kinda crimped and leftways. I'm not a believer in much myself, when it comes to your traditional monotheisms, but Abdoulla read to me like my Grandpa Ed, who for generational reasons could never come out and own his atheism (in the strictest sense), instead subsuming his wonder and prayerfulness into hymns and a love of theater. Abdoulla believes in things: his city, his friends, even the concept of duty (despite his constant bitching), and he calls those things God much like my grandfather did. Even the devil can quote scripture, but it takes a holy fool to make a fart joke and then quote scripture. Grandpa Ed would approve.

I think I'm going to go out on a limb and say this isn't going to win the Nebula. Not only is it a first novel - like any award, name recognition factors - but it also has a pretty stock fantasy plot, despite the slightly unusual main character. (I don't think the cranky mentor is unusual, just to be clear, just that it's unusual for him to be the main character. It's like if Obi Wan were the protagonist of Star Wars, and also drank and farted more.) So, enjoyable little book that doesn't set out to accomplish much, but does accomplish the small things it sets out to do. A younger version of me would probably like this more, as she wouldn't be as jaded about fantasy conventions. I feel like maybe Ahmed was working out his fantasy tropes in this his first novel, and that will leave him open to muck around with convention more in later outings. That would be swell. I'd read 'em.