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Ceridwen

Ceridwen

You kids get off my lawn. 

Wuthering Heights - Ruben Toledo, Emily Brontë A quick disclaimer: I betcha there are some spoilers in here, but I absolutely refuse to hit the spoiler box on books this old.

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My sister and I recently got into one of those stupid cage matches about which was better: Jane Eyre or Wuthering Heights. Before everyone starts popping their monocles and baying about how this is a stupid comparison & as meaningless as comparing chalk and cheese, I know. I totally know. But five hours in a car will send conversations to really weird places.

Anyway, I spent some time defending Jane, because I've read it three times. I've only listened to a shitty books-on-tape version of WH when I was 19, which was *cough* a while ago. While I may read really hard, I listen badly, and even though I wasn't that distracted - I was on another road trip - I spent a good deal of time spacing out during my listen. Add into this the fact that the guy doing the reading used Dog Voice on all of the women, I don't remember boo about the book.

A note on Dog Voice: my family may be cracked, but all of the dogs we had growing up had voices. Tessie, who was from Appalachia and was part-hound and part-werewolf, sounded like she had rocks in her mouth. She also sang opera. Kip has gravelly voice and a New York accent. For some weird reason, all of the border collie girl-dogs - I know the correct term is bitches, but I just can't - have high-pitched girly voices. Nant, who has one blue-eye and one brown, and is crazy as a loon, is almost inaudible. So, Catherine sounded like a border collie dog, and then my brain kept trying to wake up from itself, and the spacing out turned into full on WHAT IS GOING ON HERE?

So now I'm 75 pages in. This is just the funniest thing I've ever read. All the growling and slap-fights! By the 50th page two people had been attacked by dogs! I'm assured it gets even better. I don't even know how.

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Okay, so I was goofing off when I started this review talking about dogs, but dogs are all over this story. Bitches nurse their whelps in the kitchen; dogs are set on strangers in the yard; people enact the most vigorous cruelties on dogs as a manifestation of their black, black hearts. Mid-way through this novel, I had a conversation with one of my brilliant friends, and she said to watch how characters treat animals, which was smart advice. The scene where Heathcliff absconds/elopes with Isabella and hangs her dog from the neck to be rescued later by Nelly; the scene where Isabella escapes from Wuthering Heights, running past Hareton while he strangles a litter of unwanted pups: these cruelties bracket a larger brutality enacted between husbands and wives, lovers and friends, parents and children.

Ir's not that animals get it worse than people. Whoo boy, not by a stretch. There's violence everywhere: masters boxing servants, parents beating children, drunks threatening everyone with guns, wife-beating, dog-fights, fist-fights, death-threats, kidnapping, coyly hinted-at marital rape, book-burning – I could go on, but I'll stop there. The violence also has the ring of real experience – what a mouth looks like filling with blood, how the bruises change over days, how a sucker punch robs you of breath and leaves you gasping like a fish. I wonder how quiet the Brontës home life was, really. The somewhat crappy introduction to my edition, written by Alice Hoffman, indicates that the Brontës' brother was a gambler and an addict, and then rather sloppily connects the real brother with the character of Catherine's older brother who gambles away Wuthering Heights. This is too literal a reading by half. This is the story of addicts and abusers all, a shockingly intimate and muscular portrait of vice and obsession, and it's only because there aren't needles cast about on the moors that we don't quickly recognize it as early Romantic Trainspotting.


You can find the rest of this review on Soapboxing.net

Addendum:

Look, I totally get how annoying it is to find these teaser reviews that send you off site to read the rest of them. But given how Goodreads management has been insanely delete-happy about reviews that are "potentially off-topic", I'm not trusting my content to this site any longer.