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Ceridwen

Ceridwen

You kids get off my lawn. 

The queening of Ceridwen

The Queening of Ceridwen, A Welsh Corgi - Esther Elias I've been cleaning out my books for the past couple weeks, which has been an entirely complaint-worthy endeavor.* I've also had a pretty good time finding things I'd totally forgotten about, like this book. Mum bought me this book I think when I was in high school, solely on the basis of it having my name in the title. Having a really weird name meant that I never got to have those lame tourist mugs and key-chains with my name on them growing up. I disparage them now, but it is only because they are sour grapes. Sour, sour grapes.

Anyway, I totally love this book. I'm not going to star it, because I don't think the star-system here makes any sense usually, and for this it's especially weird. The Queening of Ceridwen is a book about a Welsh corgi named Ceridwen. This is a sequel of sorts to Profile of Glindy, who was also a Welsh corgi, and Ceridwen's “true love”. I'm making them sound like fiction, but they are memoirs of housepets, and totally earnest. Both books were written by their “mistress”, as she refers to herself, and are absolutely amazing. Whenever I find this book I can't help myself and read out the table of contents to my husband in a fake British accent. (This doesn't actually make any sense, because the author is from Pittsburgh.) Some chapter headings:

6. We Move From Our House on the Hill and Glindy Goes to Heaven.
10. The Story of Her Struggle With Diabetes
15. “Blest Be the Tie That Binds” – It's Ceridwen

And my all time favorite:

Epilogue....An Interview With St. Peter – Sometime Later

I am absolutely not trying to make too much fun of Ms. Elias, even though this book is completely nutty. Especially the parts where she talks to the dogs. My grandfather when he was in his 80s wrote and self-published two books, which cannot be found here on GR, although you can buy both editions for $45 on Amazon, last I checked. The first volume of Full of Sound and Fury, Grandpa's book, was a collection of plays he'd written for high school performances. He was the drama coach for a high school forever, and as a young man he did summer stock and other theatrical endeavors. His second volume was more personal hokum and anecdotes. Interestingly, he was a fan of the dramatic dialogue with imaginary or literary figure like the author here. (Maybe it's a Pittsburgh thing – that's where he lived too.) When he died, I went through the bits he was collecting for the third volume on his computer, and a lot of them were conversations he imagined himself having with God. Not serious St Augustine stuff, but like large runs of puns and literary allusions, wisecracks and goofing off. He was serious at times too, partially because I think if he had born in another time, he would have been a casual atheist, but that sort of thing was generationally impossible.

Anyway, I'm trying to wind up to a point about writing and publishing. All kinds of stuff gets written and some of that stuff gets published, and an even smaller percentage of that stuff gets read, and an even smaller percentage gets read by a large group of people. I've never read my Grandpa's books in total. I couldn't handle it when he was living, because it was all too much of that balderdash and personal mythology that I could get from him firsthand. Then he died, and it was still too much of his balderdash and bullshit, but now it was tinged with the guilt of his loss, and my never reading it while he was living.

But read or not, the writing of those books kept him alive. I am not exaggerating in any way. He was pretty active senior. He'd audit college classes ostensibly to learn something, but mostly to hang out and hold forth his brands of bs. Teachers either loved him or HATED him. But by the time he was 80, he was increasingly homebound, and as a consequence began suffering from mild depression. I don't know where he got the idea to write memoirs, but I suspect it was the man who was his editor through the process, a man who had been Grandpa's student a few decades previous. I could ask Mum. (Hi Mum!) Anyway, he started on on of those electronic typewriters and worked up to an old desktop that we gave him. He'd retreat down to his big old desk in the basement and tap away. Writing gave him a place to use his voice, let him manage his legacy, and let him act out his conversations with God. Publishing was almost incidental, although I'm sure that he, like any author, would prefer to be read.

So, I don't know. The whole thing is funny. I'm never going to read this book cover to cover, but it makes me really happy that it exists, this elderly woman writing her loving eulogies to a couple of fat, stumpy dogs. But from what little I've read, she's also working out what she thinks about the afterlife and her own approaching mortality, which is a pretty great thing for her to have done. And not to mention too sore a subject, but sometimes I see authors flip out on bad reviews from time to time. I understand; no one wants to have their work disliked or dismissed. But, God, most authors should be so lucky as to have someone read their book, let alone work up the energy to dislike it. Maybe this is just readerly arrogance, and I'd feel differently if I were published. But every book is trying to find its audience, and the review process is part of that, even the bad ones. The audience of The Queening of Ceridwen is totally girls named Ceridwen who had a grandfather from the same hometown as the author who self-published his memoirs too. The rest of you will probably not be interested. It is pretty wonderful to find every couple of years in the mess though. I still love it.



*Here's my shelves! All beautiful!

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