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Ceridwen

Ceridwen

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Blueprints of the Afterlife

Blueprints of the Afterlife - Ryan Boudinot It's possible I'll append the original review to this here new shiny one I'm writing, but that may not happen. The future's not written, right? It's something I can affect? Well, we'll see either way.

I seriously don't mean to disappear up my own reviewing asshole, but the first attempt I made to review I was in this just painfully emotional place, and it embarrasses me, because that's not really what this book is about. Blueprints of the Afterlife is - and I don't mean this statement to be reductive - just a mordantly funny genre exercise that's got its cool philosophical fingerprints around the throat of popular culture, futurism, and the American tendency towards apocalypse. The plot is...nothing that can be encapsulated with ease, more a series of very interrelated vignettes that stack themselves up into a, what?, Venn diagram? Something squishier? Our societal and metafictional guts? Then it knocks them all down and starts over again.

It's coughcough years into the future - more than 50 but less than 150 - a futuristic period that seems to be a fallow area for science fiction writers at the moment. Even my main man William Gibson who used to write in this period has decamped to closer futures (i.e. the Bigend trilogy). On the other side, there's a ton of dudes (mostly dudes) writing in the far-future post-human expanses of space and ti-ee-eye-eee-ime. Some of this is the post-post-apocalyptic bent of this novel - this is not a survivalist's manifesto, one of those musings about the order of society in crisis and whatnot, not the Individual's Search for Meaning in an Age of Fucked Up Shit - but about our tendency to imagine Fucked Up Shit as a future in the first place.

But then also a ton of other stuff. The science fictional ideas/commentary/whatever of this book are tossed off with a frequency and casualness that belie their fucking awesomeness, and there are at least a half dozen ideas here that could warrant their own freaking novel. I don't mean to imply that Boudinot is giving anything short shrift here though - these ideas are all of a piece, and they fit together like one of those boxes of shapes you get from the Science Museum, and there's 20 little flashcards of the way those shapes might make a larger pattern, and you flip over the card and go! Put it together! Now take it apart! Go! Make a different shape! Go go go!

This review is turning into the same godamn mess my first one was, only different. Which is perfect in a way. If you split a hologram in half, you get two perfect holograms, like an earthworm, but more technological. I can't even pretend to understand how that works - both the hologram and the earthworm. The central metaphor here is blueprints, those imaginings of the future written on a scaled, engineered map which may or may not give rise to the fact of buildings, in whose habitable spaces we may, or may not, live out our lives. It's just..it's just the godamn shit to read when you're a cracked and leaking emotional disaster - as I was when I read this, not to make it about you - this elegant, beautifully written puzzle that contemplated the ends beyond the ends, or the middles beyond the middles, or all permutations of continuation and cease. Which, fuck yeah.

And in the spirit of fuck yeah, I'm going to post the original review, but I'm not proud of it, and it (as I said before) kinda embarrasses me. Not because my emotional vulnerability is an embarrassment, but because I don't think it does this book justice. The earlier review was dealing with the hard edge of grief, the emotions I feel as I can see the end coming. That's not what this book is about, and I don't want to mischaracterize. This is 50 to 150 years past that fucked up shit, which is just one of the reasons I loved it so. The end is still coming, but I'm still in the middle of the middle, still.

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Original review:


I don't even mean to be like one of those cryptic facebook updates that people drop when they are looking for attention, but emotionally I am in no place to review this. Which might be the perfect place to be emotionally to review this? My beloved grandmother is dying. I read this fast like fever in the car to and from emotional upheavals that I haven't even begun to sort into something resembling sense.

So yeah, this is one of those reviews. Be warned.

I picked this up because of Josh's tumescent review. And because - I can be honest about my shallowness - this is just a fantastic cover. After I finished my read, I popped back onto Goodreads to reread Josh's review with knowing eyes. I was bolted to the floor when I saw he references Lars von Trier's Melancholia in the first few sentences.

Before I left for my visit with Grandma who is dying, on a slow Saturday, my husband pulled me down onto the couch and made me watch that film. Not all. In sections as I ran the dishwasher or packed that forgotten thing or talking on the phone to a distraught family member, imagining the family ugliness that is inevitable once she's gone. We're all considering the end, mapping out alternate futures of the end and after her end. I've had my problems with von Trier in the past that aren't worth getting into, but Melancholia was a series of images that burned me quietly, this end of the world that is both metaphor and fact. Science fiction stories can be a lot of different things, but the ones that get me scrying my own overturned guts are the ones about our personal universes as alien planets, the hard gravities of our emotions and what we tell ourselves are our emotions. The way Melancholia ran this apocalypse through a series of family connections, bright loosely connected images, the hovering close-ups and near-static tableaus - ah ah ah ah.

I spent the weekend trying to be present, trying to feel Grandma's lips when I kiss her, or her hands in mine, watching my step-mom write a list on a napkin. Presence is a difficult thing, and I'm no Taoist; my mind does not let things run as they are. My mind chews on the future. I prognosticate, therefore I am. There's a certain philosophical aridity that appeals to my presence-avoiding mind in these pages, though I admit I have close to zero interest or background in straight philosophy. Arid is maybe the wrong word. As is philosophy.

Folklore of the future?

I'm not sure that this plot can be spoiled, dealing as it does with a roving glacier of various time periods, persons, non-persons, and battling visions of the future. Sad as I am, superimposed as I am between present and future, this story, this collection of elegant, funny, wigged out, careful sentences washed me over and washed over me. I could read this forever. This could go on and on, but it ends. If I were less emotional and messy, I could catalog the influences and hat-tips, from the obvious PKD and Gibson, to the more muted Star Wars and UKL. When I talked about this with my husband, he asked what it would be like to be someone other than George Orr in The Lathe of Heaven, someone changed subtly or largely in someone else's sleep. It will be hours before I know she's gone - this is the way of things; the phone-tree is long and branching - and in those hours will she continue as if that end hadn't happened? Will she be gone in those hours? There's questions like that everywhere here.

This book probably deserves a less sloppy reader, one that isn't leaking at the seams. My dad did all the sodoku puzzles from the last two weeks of the paper; I read this. I was fully absorbed in the intellectual puzzle of end-times and the after-end, a game of futures. I can't unbind my emotions from the end of it all, the end of her all. But the blueprints lay down blue and bloodless. They make me think. They make me wonder - in that old school awestruck sense. And I know that absolutely none of this makes sense, which is why it is such a comfort.